The enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of a quantum system by its environment (the Purcell effect [1]) have many potential applications. Plasmonic cavities, made of metallic nanostructures, enable the observation of this effect  at subwavelength scales[2].  Hence, they are promising structures for fabricating nanophotonic devices, e.g., single-photon sources[2,3], miniaturized coherent light sources[4] and ultra-small sensors[5]. In this literature seminar, I will describe the design of plasmonic cavities and their optical properties.

 

References:

  1. E. M. Purcell, H. C. Torrey, and R. V. Pound, Phys. Rev., vol. 69, pp. 37–38,1946.
  2. J. T. Hugall, A. Singh, N. F. van Hulst, ACS Photonics, vol 5, pp 43-53, 2018.‏
  3. G. Zhu, Q. Liao, Opt. express, vol 26, pp 31391-31401, 2018.   ‏
  4. A. Yang, D. Wang, W. Wang, and T. W. Odom,  Annu. Rev. Phys., vol 68, pp 83-99, 2017.
  5. S.H. Kwon, Plasmonics, vol 8, pp 963-967, 2013.‏